"9/11 | Coming Together" 20th Anniversary Special

The Tabernacle Choir Blog

The First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles Often Begin Meetings With This Hymn

Elder Dallin H. Oaks of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles spoke in the October 1994 general conference on the topic of music in worship. His inspirational talk details experiences across the globe, from Brazil to Hawaii, with moving accounts of the impact of music in the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Elder Oaks discusses the important role of music in Church services, whether there are many in attendance or just a small gathering. Additionally, Elder Oaks gives insight into the music that is sung when the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles get together for their weekly meeting. An excerpt is below:

The weekly meetings of the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the Salt Lake Temple always begin with a hymn. Elder Russell M. Nelson plays the organ accompaniment. The First Presidency, who conduct these meetings, rotate the privilege of selecting the opening song. Most of us record the date each hymn is sung. According to my records, the opening song most frequently sung during the decade of my participation has been “I Need Thee Every Hour” (Hymns, 1985, no. 98). Picture the spiritual impact of a handful of the Lord’s servants singing that song before praying for his guidance in fulfilling their mighty responsibilities.

Click here to read the full talk »

Annie Hawks was the mother of three children when she wrote the lyrics to “I Need Thee Every Hour.” She later said, “I remember well the morning when in the midst of the daily cares of my home, I was so filled with the sense of the nearness of the Master, that wondering how one could live without him either in joy or pain, these words ‘I Need Thee Every Hour’ were ushered into my mind.”

Click here to read more about the history of this hymn »

A Relief Society choir from YSA stakes in Salt Lake City sing “I Need Thee Every Hour” at a general Relief Society meeting in the video below.