Watch the Tabernacle Organ Virtuoso Performance with Dr. Gabriele Terrone
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The livestream is also available at YouTube.com/thetabernaclechoir.
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Videos

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August 14, 2022 - #4848 Music & the Spoken Word

The Music & the Spoken Word broadcast airs live via TV, radio, and internet stream on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. mountain time. For information on other airtimes, visit “Airing Schedules” at musicandthespokenword.org.

Music

Conductor:  Mack Wilberg
Organist: Linda Margetts
Announcer: Lloyd Newell

“Come, Ye Children of the Lord”
Music: Spanish melody
Lyrics: James H. Wallis
Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

“Look at the World”
Music and Lyrics: John Rutter

“Praise to the Lord, the Almighty” (organ solo)
Music: German hymn tune
Arrangement: James C. Kasen

“Be Still, My Soul”1
Music: Jean Sibelius
Lyrics: Katharina von Schlegel, trans. Jane Borthwick
Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

“This Little Light of Mine”
Music and Lyrics: African-American spiritual
Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

“Press Forward, Saints”2
Music: Vanja Y. Watkins
Lyrics: Marvin K. Gardner
Arrangement: Mack Wilberg 

  1. From the album Peace Like a River.
  2. From the album Let Us All Press On.

The Spoken Word

Share Your Talents

Written by Joni Hilton

If you’ve ever been to a talent show, you may have noticed that certain talents are easier to notice—and easier to “show”—than others. The talents that get the most applause tend to be talents in music, dance, or visual arts. Those who are skilled in sports and academics are also well recognized. If we lack such wonderful abilities, we may conclude that we simply are not talented.

But God has many gifts to give—each one fitted to the needs and circumstances of His many children. Solomon of old was wise. Joseph of Egypt was quick to forgive. And countless parents have the gift of patience. Some of us are good at organizing, teaching, or simply cheering up those who are discouraged. Compassion, trustworthiness, loyalty, optimism, being a peacemaker—these talents may be hard to display onstage, but think of how your life has been blessed by people who possess and share such gifts.

A good listener may save someone from despair. Someone with the discipline to keep trying may solve problems or make discoveries beyond our imagination. And holding one’s tongue has surely saved many a relationship.

Whatever our talents may be, they rarely come to us fully developed. Talents grow because we’re willing to keep trying, even if others around us seem more talented. For example, a young boy was disheartened when his sketch didn’t receive an “A” in school. But he turned his drawing into a birthday card for his grandmother, which brought tremendous joy into her life.

Consider the words of author Elizabeth Charles, who said, “The woods would be very silent if no bird sang but those that sing best.”1

What a bleak world it would be if only the best contributed. We are all enriched by the generosity of every soul. We need not be famous or acclaimed to bless others with the unique talents God has given us.

In the familiar Bible story, the Lord entrusted His servants with sums of money—called talents—in varying amounts. He equally praised those who, rather than burying their talents, used and developed what He gave them, whether it was much or little.2 Whatever measure of talent we have, it can bless the world around us—but only if we share it. 

  1. Elizabeth Charles, The Two Vocations (1865), 43.
  2. See Matthew 25:14–23.