Videos

March 30, 2022 | #151 Piping Up! Organ Concerts at Temple Square

Piping Up! Organ Concerts at Temple Square is streamed online every Wednesday at 12:00 noon MDT. Piping Up! can be viewed on TheTabernacleChoir.org, the Choir’s YouTube channel, the Choir’s Facebook page, and Broadcasts.ChurchofJesusChrist.org. When concerts are concluded, they are available for on-demand viewing on the Choir’s website, YouTube and Facebook.

These programs continue the tradition of noon organ recitals at Temple Square—a tradition that has lasted for more than a century. The concerts are produced without an audience and comply with all COVID-19 guidelines. Each concert will feature a different Tabernacle or Temple Square organist and is hosted by Luke Howard.

Repertoire

Organist: Linda Margetts

1. a. Oh, Savior Thou Who Wearest a Crown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hans Leo Hassler
    b. Herzlich tut mich Verlangen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hans Leo Hassler
2. a. O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden (Herzlich tut mich verlangen). .Hans Leo Hassler
    b. O Saviour, Thou Who Wearest A Crown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hans Leo Hassler
3. a. Come, Come, Ye Saints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . arr. by organist
    b. God Is Love . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .arr. by organist
4. In Paradisium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gabriel Fauré

Focus Piece

An on-going feature of Piping Up! Organ Concerts at Temple Square is a focus piece with additional inspirational background on a specific repertoire selection. Written by host Luke Howard, a professor of music at Brigham Young University, the focus piece connects the music in a unique way to lift and inspire listeners.

“In paradisum,” from Requiem (Fauré, trans. Dupré)

Gabriel Fauré claimed to have written his Requiem “for fun,” but in the two years leading up to the Requiem’s premiere in January, 1888, both of his parents died. He never claimed that the loss of his mother and father directly inspired any aspect of this composition. But he ensured that it was a Requiem of peace, not fear, and that it expressed his faith in the prospect of eternal rest. He claimed that his little chamber Requiem was as gentle as he was himself.

With that goal in mind, Fauré left the “Dies irae” out of his Requiem. The “Dies irae” is the traditional portion of a Requiem Mass where the judgements of God are presented with fiery, vengeful clarity. To compensate, Fauré concludes his Requiem with an “In paradisum.” This was not part of the common liturgy, and was in fact a relatively obscure liturgical text at the time. But, on those rare occasions when the “In paradisum” was sung, it was at the end of a funeral, as the casket was being moved from the church to the graveyard. It was always a conclusion to a service.

Unlike every other section of Fauré’s Requiem, the “In paradisum” is not directed to God, but addresses instead the souls of the departed, encouraging them on their journey toward heaven and eternal rest. The text is quite beautiful:

May the angels lead you into paradise,
May the martyrs receive you at your arrival
And guide you to the Holy City, Jerusalem.
May the choir of angels receive you,
And with Lazarus, who was once poor,
May you have eternal rest.

In choosing this text, Fauré was able to open and close the entire work with the word “requiem” or “rest,” emphasizing that perpetual focus on what he termed the “happy release” of death, and the peace and comfort of a heavenly afterlife.