"9/11 | Coming Together" 20th Anniversary Special

Videos

September 20, 2020 - #4749 "Some Things We're Learning"

The Music & the Spoken Word broadcast airs live via TV, radio, and internet stream on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. mountain time. For information on other airtimes, visit “Airing Schedules” at musicandthespokenword.org.

This encore performance of Music & the Spoken Word has been specially selected for airing while the Choir and Orchestra are practicing social distancing. It contains a new Spoken Word, written and delivered by Lloyd Newell.

Music

Conductor: Mack Wilberg
Organist: Brian Mathias
Announcer: Lloyd Newell

“Morning Has Broken”1,5
Music: Gaelic melody
Lyrics: Eleanor Farjeon
Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

“Lead, Kindly Light”2
Music: John B. Dykes
Lyrics: John Henry Newman
Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

“Trumpet Tune” (organ solo)
Music: David German

“Happy and Blest Are They” from St. Paul
Music: Felix Mendelssohn

“Who Will Buy?”3,5 from Oliver
Music and Lyrics: Lionel Bart
Arrangement: Michael Davis

“My God, My Portion, and My Love”4
Music: American folk hymn 
Lyrics: Isaac Watts
Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

  1. On the CD Consider the Lilies.
  2. On the CD Then Sings My Soul.
  3. On the CD Showtime!
  4. On the CD Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing.
  5. In the CD set Encore Collection.

The Spoken Word

Some Things We’re Learning

So often in life, we are taught by trials. We don’t get to choose our difficulties and challenges, but we do get to choose whether or not we will learn something from them. We can all think of personal trials we’ve had to face—everyone has them. But it’s not often that the entire world faces the same challenge—the same learning experience—at the same time. 

Essentially, that’s what is happening as the world has struggled, suffered, and learned together during the outbreak of COVID-19. Everyone everywhere has been touched by the spread of this deadly virus, though it has affected different people in different ways. For many, it has upended life as we know it, transforming the way we think about family and relationships, health care and high tech, politics and business. All of us have been called upon to make sacrifices to contain the virus, and some of those sacrifices have been difficult. And all of us are learning some important lessons. 

For one thing, we’re learning how much we need each other. We live in a smaller and smaller world, and it’s sobering to realize how our choices can affect people a world away. We need to be able to count on one other, depend on each other. So many are reaching out to be part of the solution. People are stepping up to help each other, to check on those at risk, to be a little more caring and friendly. In a surprising twist, social distancing is actually helping many families and communities grow closer! 

In addition, we’re learning more about how to live wisely and be prepared for uncertainties. We feel more gratitude now when we see fully stocked shelves at a grocery store, and we’re learning not to take truck drivers or air travel or anything else for granted. 

We’re learning that when all is said and done, the key to emotional, mental, and spiritual health is to stay positive and hold on to hope. We’re discovering, together, that things get better in time. The darkening clouds eventually give way to the light of the sun. 

We all know the future is uncertain and at times scary. But with caring citizenship as our approach, conscientious preparation as our objective, and positive hope as our outlook, we can weather any storm. We just need to remember the things we’re learning—together.